RackNerd Black Friday 2020 Specials

The following are Black Friday specials available through RackNerd hosting. Everyone is encouraged to share any opinions or experiences they have with RackNerd in comments here, but my personal experience has been one of no issues.

KVM Linux VPS

512MB KVM VPS — $8.89/year
1x vCPU Core
15 GB SSD Cached Storage
512MB RAM
1000GB Monthly Transfer
1Gbps Network Port
Full Root Admin Access
KVM / SolusVM Control Panel
Locations: San Jose, Seattle, Dallas, Chicago, New Jersey, New York, Atlanta, or Ashburn

1GB KVM VPS — $15.25/year
1x vCPU Core
30 GB SSD Cached Storage
1GB RAM
3500GB Monthly Transfer
1Gbps Network Port
Full Root Admin Access
1 Dedicated IPv4 Address
KVM / SolusVM Control Panel
Locations: San Jose, Seattle, Dallas, Chicago, New Jersey, New York, Atlanta, or Ashburn

2GB KVM VPS — $21.79/year
2x vCPU Core
45 GB SSD Cached Storage
2GB RAM
6000GB Monthly Transfer
1Gbps Network Port
Full Root Admin Access
1 Dedicated IPv4 Address
KVM / SolusVM Control Panel
Locations: San Jose, Seattle, Dallas, Chicago, New Jersey, New York, Atlanta, or Ashburn

2.5GB KVM VPS — $27.50/year
3x vCPU Core
55 GB SSD Cached Storage
2.5GB RAM
7000GB Monthly Transfer
1Gbps Network Port
Full Root Admin Access
1 Dedicated IPv4 Address
KVM / SolusVM Control Panel
Locations: San Jose, Seattle, Dallas, Chicago, New Jersey, New York, Atlanta, or Ashburn

4.5GB KVM VPS — $46.89/year
3x vCPU Core
83 GB SSD Cached Storage
4.5GB RAM
9500GB Monthly Transfer
1Gbps Network Port
Full Root Admin Access
1 Dedicated IPv4 Address
KVM / SolusVM Control Panel
Locations: San Jose, Seattle, Dallas, Chicago, New Jersey, New York, Atlanta, or Ashburn

Windows VPS

2GB Windows VPS — $60/year
1x AMD Ryzen CPU Core
35GB NVMe SSD Storage
2GB RAM
200GB Monthly Transfer
1Gbps Network Port
Full Administrator Access
Remote Desktop (RDP Access)
1 Dedicated IPv4 Address
KVM / SolusVM Control Panel
Windows Server 2012 or 2016 OS
Locations: Los Angeles Datacenter

3.5GB Windows VPS — $99/year
2x AMD Ryzen CPU Core
60GB NVMe SSD Storage
3.5GB RAM
200GB Monthly Transfer
1Gbps Network Port
Full Administrator Access
Remote Desktop (RDP Access)
1 Dedicated IPv4 Address
KVM / SolusVM Control Panel
Windows Server 2012 or 2016 OS
Locations: Los Angeles Datacenter

8GB Windows VPS — $219/year
3x AMD Ryzen CPU Core
150GB NVMe SSD Storage
8GB RAM
10,000GB Monthly Transfer
1Gbps Network Port
Full Administrator Access
Remote Desktop (RDP Access)
1 Dedicated IPv4 Address
KVM / SolusVM Control Panel
Windows Server 2012 or 2016 OS
Locations: Los Angeles Datacenter

Shared Hosting with cPanel Control Panel

50GB Shared Hosting — $8.50/year
50GB SSD Disk Space
3TB Monthly Transfer
Unlimited Databases
Host 3 Domains
Free SSL Certificates
cPanel Control Panel
Softaculous Scripts Installer
LiteSpeed Web Server
Free Offsite Daily Backups (JetBackup)

80GB Shared Hosting — $12.99/year
80GB SSD Disk Space
5TB Monthly Transfer
Unlimited Databases
Host 5 Domains
Free SSL Certificates
cPanel Control Panel
Softaculous Scripts Installer
LiteSpeed Web Server
Free Offsite Daily Backups (JetBackup)

150GB Shared Hosting — $24.99/year
150GB SSD Disk Space
10TB Monthly Transfer
Unlimited Databases
Host Unlimited Domains
Free SSL Certificates
cPanel Control Panel
Softaculous Scripts Installer
LiteSpeed Web Server
Free Offsite Daily Backups (JetBackup)

Reseller Hosting with cPanel/WHM

50GB Reseller Hosting — $24.99/year
50GB SSD Disk Space
2TB Monthly Transfer
10 cPanel Accounts
Free SSL Certificates
CloudLinux Powered
cPanel & WHM Control Panel
Softaculous Scripts Installer
LiteSpeed Web Server
Free Offsite Daily Backups (JetBackup)

120GB Reseller Hosting — $39/year
120GB SSD Disk Space
3.5TB Monthly Transfer
15 cPanel Accounts
Free SSL Certificates
CloudLinux Powered
cPanel & WHM Control Panel
Softaculous Scripts Installer
LiteSpeed Web Server
Free Offsite Daily Backups (JetBackup)

200GB Reseller Hosting — $59/year
200GB SSD Disk Space
6TB Monthly Transfer
25 cPanel Accounts
Free SSL Certificates
CloudLinux Powered
cPanel & WHM Control Panel
Softaculous Scripts Installer
LiteSpeed Web Server
Free Offsite Daily Backups (JetBackup)

The Linux Hurdle

Okay. After talking with a co-worker yesterday about why he should install Linux on his somewhat-antiquated Vista-ran laptop, I ran into road blocks. He’s pretty reluctant to heed my suggestion and even dip his toes, let alone jump in head-first.

I’ve tried to make points of why I like Linux better than Windows. However, the truth is that I don’t consider Linux a replacement for Windows. It’s like driving vehicles. I drive my smaller compact car almost everyday, because it’s more convenient for typical day travelling and it gets better gas-mileage. So, why do I keep my pick-up truck? It’s a gas guzzler, and depending on the time and place it can be impossible to find a parking spot. Still, if I have to haul something or traverse tougher terrain that requires a vehicle with more clearance or four-wheel drive, my truck is there to save the day. In this case, my compact car is Linux and my truck is Windows. Linux will almost always get the job done, typically faster and with less hassle, while Windows is there to provide any crucial services that Linux just can’t do.

Being that my co-worker’s laptop hard-drive is fairly full, he’s running Vista and he says he has never de-fragged his hard-drive, I’d bet that I can boot up, check my emails, pay a couple of bills, shut down and boot back up to my work space in Linux before he even reaches his desktop for the first time in Vista. And my Linux setup has been installed for nearly two years now. Though, I’d say a fresh install of Linux wouldn’t do it any better. The same can’t be said for Windows.

But like I said, I’m not saying throw Windows out the window. I’m just saying make use of the tools available to you. What’s the point of booting into Windows to do generic tasks that end up taking far longer to complete than they necessarily have to? After all, the less you use Windows, the longer it takes to slow down. Of course, good practices and regular maintenance can help keep Windows running as good as possible. But when you can minimize the amount of work necessary in those respects as well, it makes no sense not to at least dip your toes in. And the sales pitch is spot on: Linux is free, it is generally designed to boot alongside of Windows and it is fairly easy to remove it and revert back to just having Windows if you decide you don’t wish to keep it.

I hope my co-worker comes to the decision of giving Linux a shot. After all, I never used Linux once until two years ago when I decided that testing out a freely available OS seemed like a fun endeavour. It ended up causing me to change up my routine permanently.

Before Installing Windows…

For anyone who is considering an upgrade for Windows, heed this warning before you choose to do so via a fresh install: get your drivers ready.

Many people take for granted that Windows works right out of the box. I think it is especially the case considering that Windows actually doesn’t work right out of the box. In most cases, Windows can’t even successfully find software drivers online when trying to install a simple peripheral device, so it surely does a poor job of working with the essential hardware of your PC as-is.

If you don’t know what I mean, then it means you’ve never taken a standard Windows installation and used it to install Windows onto a PC before. It’s safe to say that everyone is familiar with purchasing a computer with Windows pre-installed. In some cases, you may even be familiar with the luxury of having a Factory System Restore CD/DVD, though it’s not common with new PCs today. Either way, the biggest difference between having a Factory System Restore option (either on as physical medium or as an image on the hard-drive) and a standard installation method (Windows, of some version and edition, that you buy separately to use on any PC) is that the Factory System Restore method will include the drivers for your PC’s hardware already included. When you use the Factory System Restore image, your PC will boot up with the resolution looking nice and all network peripherals working as they should. Yet, if you install Windows from something other than a Factory System Restore image that is made specifically for your PC, you’ll find the resolution to be poor (and unchangeable) and no ability to access the internet even through your wired ethernet port.

In one of few ways, this is how Linux distributions really have a one-up on Windows. Because most essential hardware will work before you install the additional drivers, especially the ethernet port (which allows an easier path to obtaining essential drivers). When I installed Windows, I had to find a copy of my PC’s mobo, video and ethernet drivers, place them on a USB drive and then put them onto the PC I had installed Windows on.

In all truthfulness, Windows worked great after installing the drivers, but the real point is that you need to know to do this. I’ve heard of some people installing a Windows upgrade and then reverting back to their previous Windows version because they thought there was an issue with their PC being able to run Windows when they were presented with the lower resolution and unusable ethernet.

So, be prepared. Because if the PC you’re upgrading is the only one you have access too, and you don’t prepare a way to install the drivers onto the PC without internet-access beforehand, you might find yourself in a tough situation – such as with a temporarily useless PC.