Ubuntu 18.04 Live Installation – How To Reboot

Just a quick tidbit for those who found themselves stuck at the nefarious Please remove installation medium, then reboot. message that restarting/shutting down from a Live Boot of Ubuntu 18.04 presents. I’ve seen several people mention this problem after it popped up for me after running it for a test, but I didn’t see any solution mentioned. Everyone stated that they had to hard reboot their PC by holding in the Power Button. As most will find out, pressing Enter, Esc or any other usual common keystrokes to progress will do nothing. I even tried a console command such as sudo reboot with no luck – even though the screen doesn’t technically present a terminal prompt (just trying anything at that point).

So, do I have a solution? Yep…

CTRL + C

You’ll see your screen magically go black and reboot the PC (even if you chose Shutdown from the exiting menu in the Ubuntu Live Session). The only other nuisance I’ve seen this with (and this could just be something to do with my particular setup) is that the EFI OS boot manager gets altered and sets Windows Boot Manager as the first order option on the machine after running the Live Session. Unsure if that’s something to do with Ubuntu (it happens when testing KDE neon, as well, which is Ubuntu-based) or something to do with the fact that the PC booting is managed via EFI. Some might manage to boot into Linux and reinstall Grub to get around this, but really going into the BIOS/UEFI settings when the PC boots and just rearranging the OS boot manager order in the system configuration gets things back to the way they were before. An easy fix, but just annoying that I’ve had to do this each time I’ve tested a Live Boot of Ubuntu or KDE neon (ended up installing Linux Mint 19 from the first test of the Live Session, so didn’t see if it would cause the same issue).

I do think it’s stupid that the latest LTS version of Ubuntu doesn’t provide a more straight-forward approach to this situation (the historical Remove media and press Enter. has always worked well, and is still how other distros do it), but… there ya go. At least a proper resolution does exist until Canonical sorts out the emotional storm they seem to be going through to get back to the straight and narrow.

As for a return to Gnome… I thought the desktop looked fine. I’ve never been a fan of the Ubuntu purple theme color, but Gnome seems to run as well as Unity did in my previous Ubuntu experiences. I only started using Ubuntu around the coming of 12.04, so I wasn’t familiar with the Gnome 2 Ubuntu of past times. For what it was, Unity seemed fine to me. The only thing that pushed me away from using Ubuntu was Canonical’s more commercial minded moves to forcing Amazon, tracking and profiting off of dash searches and the such. Even if there were ways to get around it all, the problem is that Canonical wanted to force those practices onto its users in the first place. I’ll compare it with phpBB’s attempt to fund itself by profiting from video embeds in newer versions of their software. The difference, however, is that phpBB lets you know that this is something that they would like for you to do upon installing the software on your website, and provide appropriate (and simple) means of opting out of doing so. Like Canonical, the developers of phpBB provide their product as free-to-use, but gain some profits from services related to the product. However, where it seems to stand out to me (and this is from the layman point of view) is that they are being fairly transparent about their practices to attempt funding their work from your use of their otherwise completely free product. Canonical, instead, went about it in a way that seemed to imply that they didn’t want the user to know it was happening. I know this is a dead-horse subject that was beaten to that point several years ago, but that is ultimately why I ditched Ubuntu for other distros – even ones that link back to Ubuntu as a base. Up until recently, I’ve been happy using Linux Mint – and with the discontinuation of their KDE option, I’ll likely also be looking to KDE neon. With alternatives such as these available to me, I’d be quite surprised if I ever install Ubuntu on anything I own as a day-to-day use OS ever again.