The Linux Hurdle

Okay. After talking with a co-worker yesterday about why he should install Linux on his somewhat-antiquated Vista-ran laptop, I ran into road blocks. He’s pretty reluctant to heed my suggestion and even dip his toes, let alone jump in head-first.

I’ve tried to make points of why I like Linux better than Windows. However, the truth is that I don’t consider Linux a replacement for Windows. It’s like driving vehicles. I drive my smaller compact car almost everyday, because it’s more convenient for typical day travelling and it gets better gas-mileage. So, why do I keep my pick-up truck? It’s a gas guzzler, and depending on the time and place it can be impossible to find a parking spot. Still, if I have to haul something or traverse tougher terrain that requires a vehicle with more clearance or four-wheel drive, my truck is there to save the day. In this case, my compact car is Linux and my truck is Windows. Linux will almost always get the job done, typically faster and with less hassle, while Windows is there to provide any crucial services that Linux just can’t do.

Being that my co-worker’s laptop hard-drive is fairly full, he’s running Vista and he says he has never de-fragged his hard-drive, I’d bet that I can boot up, check my emails, pay a couple of bills, shut down and boot back up to my work space in Linux before he even reaches his desktop for the first time in Vista. And my Linux setup has been installed for nearly two years now. Though, I’d say a fresh install of Linux wouldn’t do it any better. The same can’t be said for Windows.

But like I said, I’m not saying throw Windows out the window. I’m just saying make use of the tools available to you. What’s the point of booting into Windows to do generic tasks that end up taking far longer to complete than they necessarily have to? After all, the less you use Windows, the longer it takes to slow down. Of course, good practices and regular maintenance can help keep Windows running as good as possible. But when you can minimize the amount of work necessary in those respects as well, it makes no sense not to at least dip your toes in. And the sales pitch is spot on: Linux is free, it is generally designed to boot alongside of Windows and it is fairly easy to remove it and revert back to just having Windows if you decide you don’t wish to keep it.

I hope my co-worker comes to the decision of giving Linux a shot. After all, I never used Linux once until two years ago when I decided that testing out a freely available OS seemed like a fun endeavour. It ended up causing me to change up my routine permanently.