Linux Mint MATE: Default Num Lock, Keyboard Shortcuts and System Monitor

This post is in reference to an earlier one, which can be found here.

The difference is that this example refers to Linux Mint using the MATE desktop environment. The reason I’m posting this is because I’ve recently installed Linux Mint with MATE, and was shocked to not only find no keyboard shortcut for System Monitor (which is missing by default in Ubuntu as well) but also no shortcut to terminal. So, I will explain how to add these. The steps are actually just as simple as the ones used for adding shortcuts to Ubuntu.

Personally, I find the layout of the configuration GUI for keyboard settings a little less convenient in Linux Mint from Ubuntu’s Unity, but it’s still usable and I was able to get the job done just fine without referring to any help online. The place where I found myself stuck for a second was the command used for launching these applications. In Ubuntu, System Monitor is accessed by the command gnome-system-monitor. However, in Linux Mint with MATE, it is mate-system-monitor. Not really all that shocking once you realize it, but it took me a minute to realize that I wasn’t using Gnome or a relative desktop.

But anyway. To configure keyboard shortcuts in Linux Mint with MATE, simply go to the Menu on the taskbar and click Control Center, which is about five options up from the bottom. Under the Personal category, which is at the top of the window, you’ll see Keyboard Shortcuts, which is likely the second option down from the top at the far right. One this window is opened, you can just stop. Don’t bother looking for a shortcut for either Terminal or System Monitor – just in case you’re thinking one may exist. It doesn’t, at least not if you’re using Maya. When you’re ready to create a shortcut, just click the + Add button at the bottom. The new window that pops up is exactly like what is seen in Ubuntu. Two lines: one for the title and one for the command that is called. If you wish to create a shortcut for Terminal, the command should be mate-terminal . If you wish to create one for System Monitor, the command should be mate-system-monitor , as mentioned earlier in the post. Then assigning the key combination for the shortcuts is also exactly as in Ubuntu: you simply click the shortcut you created in the list and then when it says New shortcut to the right, you hit the key combination you wish to use on your keyboard. Done.

Lastly, if you wish to have Num Lock turned on by default when you log into Linux Mint, simply open up Control Center from the Menu (as explained above), click Keyboard under the Hardware category, click the Layouts tab at the top, click the Options… button near the bottom, expand the Miscellaneous compatibility options branch and check the box next to Default numeric keypad keys. If you’ve done this in Ubuntu, you’ll also see that this is very similar.